fjm: (Default)
A British Jew is waiting in line to be knighted by the Queen. He is to kneel in front of her and recite a sentence in Latin when she taps him on the shoulders with her sword. However, when his turn comes, he panics in the excitement of the moment and forgets the Latin. Then, thinking fast, he recites the only other sentence he knows in a foreign language, which he remembers from the Passover seder:

"Ma nishtana ha layla ha zeh mi kol ha laylot."

Puzzled, Her Majesty turns to her advisor and whispers, "Why is this knight different from all other knights?"
fjm: (Default)
The critic and scholar Joe Sutliff Sanders and his family are currently in Luxembourg. For complicated visa reasons they need to come to the UK and then re-enter.

They need accommodation in London from 30 March to 4th April. We'd offer but we are already booked.

It's two adults and two small children.

Can anyone help?
fjm: (Default)
This is a sequel to Tips for Getting your PhD:at LJ  http://fjm.livejournal.com/1225525.html/ or DW http://fjm.dreamwidth.org/23705.html

Over the years I have discovered that many people don’t know how to figure out that their PhD (or book) is finished; or, and related, that they find the completing of the PhD takes almost as long as the writing of the first draft.

For better or worse, on the Belbin test I am a completer/finish. I don’t actually share the weakness of this type in that I am not particularly meticulous and I am not a perfectionist, but some of the reasons for that, is that I believe firmly in something that is often derided. Competence. And that is where I am going to begin.
Read more... ).






























fjm: (Default)
Or at least of a philosophy of science fiction...

I've just read John Inglesant by J H Shorthouse, for my work on English Civil War fiction.

The edition I have (1930) has an 1881 introduction which is actually more interesting than the novel. Shorthouse wants to create Philosophy Fiction. "books where fiction is used expressly for the purpose of introducing Philosophy. In such books, where philosophy is put first and fiction only second, it is evidently permissible to introduce much, and to introduce it in a way, which could not have been tolerated in pure fiction." Translation: if I feel like giving you a three page lecture on Arminianism, while reducing five years in my hero's life to one paragraph, I will.

As far as the creation of "realism" is concerned, Shorthouse declares,

"The characters are, so to speak, sublimated: they are only introduced for a set purpose, and having fulfilled this purpose--were it only to speak a dozen words--they vanish from the stage." Which as he points out, is in a way not so unlike real life. He continues...

"To compare such a book with the most successful efforts of the greatest masters of modern fction, where everything is sacrificed to sparling dialogue, is to aim beside the mark. Everything which these great masters have so successfully accomplished, it was, fortunately for me, my business carefully to avoid."


Hugo Gernsback, eat your heart out.
fjm: (Default)
THE ROBERT MURRAY MEMORIAL LECTURE

TRANSLATING HISTORY TO TELEVISION

DR. PAMELA COX (UNIVERSITY OF ESSEX)

2.15 Saturday 27 April 2013
Lord Ashcroft Building (LAB) Room 002
Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge

This will be a stimulating lecture about the problems of doing History on television delivered by one of Britain’s leading historians.

Dr. Cox is a historian and sociologist at Essex University. In 2012, she presented the acclaimed BBC series, Servants: The True History of Life Below Stairs. When it was shown, critics noted that the series presented a very different view of servant life from television’s Downton Abbey and was considered one of the best presentations of social history that has been offered by the BBC. Pamela Cox will talk in her lecture about the problems of doing History on Television and will use some extracts from her series.

Her book, Bad Girls in Britain (2002), explored the lives of many 'immoral' and criminal young women in the first half of the twentieth century. It followed them into the many reform homes, moral welfare homes and rescue homes that operated at the time, which trained thousands of them as servants. There are significant similarities between these homes and Ireland's infamous Magdalen Laundries. This will be the subject of a follow-up series to Servants with BBC2 later in the year.

All Welcome! No Ticket required. Open to the public. Any queries, please contact Professor Rohan McWilliam (rohan.mcwilliam@anglia.ac.uk)



Professor Rohan McWilliam
Course Leader for History/Professor of Modern British History
Department of Humanities and Social Sciences
Anglia Ruskin University
East Road
Cambridge CB1 1PT
UNITED KINGDOM

Email: rohan.mcwilliam@anglia.ac.uk
Work Tel: 0845-196-2764 (direct)
International Tel: +44(0)1223 363271 x.2764
fjm: (Default)
Contact Peadhar O Guillin

peadarog at gmail.com

He is looking for YA writers and YA ideas.

Shoes!

Feb. 28th, 2013 05:13 pm
fjm: (Default)
Post at LJ where it will let me put pictures: http://fjm.livejournal.com/1229034.html
fjm: (Default)
Registration is now open for a one-day conference at University College London on Saturday 27 April to explore aspects of Victorian Comedy and to reflect on ways in which we might teach it.

The event will consist of papers from invited experts on Victorian Comedy:

Professor Michael Slater (University of London) on Punch Serials
Dr Carolyn Oulton (Christchurch, Canterbury) on Jerome K Jerome
Dr Ann Featherstone (Manchester) on Comedy in Victorian Circuses
Dr Oliver Double (Kent) on Little Tich
Professor Peter Swaab (UCL) on Edward Lear
Dr Jonathan Wild (Edinburgh) on Comedy in Masculine Middlebrow Literature
Dr Louise Lee (Roehampton) on Darwin’s Humour

There will also be a roundtable on the teaching of Victorian Comedy chaired by Dr Jonathan Wild and Dr Jane Darcy (UCL)

Thanks to generous funding from the UCL Arts and Humanities Faculty the event, which includes refreshments, lunch and a wine reception, will be free of charge.


To register for the conference or make an enquiry, please contact Dr Jane Darcy, Department of English, University College London: j.darcy@ucl.ac.uk <mailto:j.darcy@ucl.ac.uk>
fjm: (Default)
"Measles Virus and Autism: a saga of ineptitude" - A Childhood & Youth Research Institute (CYRI) Seminar

Presented by: Professor Stephen Bustin, Professor of Allied Health and Medicine, Postgraduate Medical Institute
Date: Wednesday 13th March 2013, 5pm
Venue: Chelmsford Campus, room Mab002
fjm: (Default)
Wesleyan University Press are pleased to announce Here Be Dragons: Exploring Fantasy Maps and Settings, a new book by Stefan Ekman

The first in-depth study of the use of landscape in fantasy literature

Fantasy worlds are never mere backdrops. They are an integral part of the work, and refuse to remain separate from other elements. These worlds combine landscape with narrative logic by incorporating alternative rules about cause and effect or physical transformation. They become actors in the drama—interacting with the characters, offering assistance or hindrance, and making ethical demands. In Here Be Dragons, Stefan Ekman provides a wide-ranging survey of the ubiquitous fantasy map as the point of departure for an in-depth discussion of what such maps can tell us about what is important in the fictional worlds and the stories that take place there. With particular focus on J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, Ekman shows how fantasy settings deserve serious attention from both readers and critics. Includes insightful readings of works by Steven Brust, Garth Nix, Robert Holdstock, Terry Pratchett, Charles de Lint, China Miéville, Patricia McKillip, Tim Powers, Lisa Goldstein, Steven R. Donaldson, Robert Jordan, and Neil Gaiman and Charles Vess.
For more details on this book, click here. Also available as an ebook -- check with your favorite ebook retailer.

Click here to forward this e-mail to a friend!

ORDERING DETAILS:
SAVE 30% on print editions when you order from the above web site and use discount code W301 -- use the "details" link above. Or order through your favorite bookseller, or by calling University Press of New England at 1-800-421-1561 (or 603-448-1533, x255 or x256). US Shipping charges are $5.00 for the first book and $1.25 for each additional. In CANADA, order through the University of British Columbia Press at (800) 565-9523 or email mailto:utpbooks@utpress.utoronto.ca In EUROPE, order through Eurospan at +44 (0) 207 240 0856 or email mailto:orders@edspubs.co.uk


Academic users may order an Examination Copy for potential course adoption. Please request a copy of the book in a letter on your institutional letterhead, and include the course title, estimated enrollment, and $5.00 for shipping (check, MasterCard, Visa, Discover, AmEx). Mail your request to: UPNE, Attn: Exam Copies, 1 Court Street, Suite 250, Lebanon, NH 03766-1358, USA or fax to (603) 448-9429.
fjm: (Default)
Many years ago, when I must have been around 9 or 10 years old, we were having the house renovated. At one stage, there was no front to the house, and no stair case.

The dog (a basset hound) had to be carried up the ladder every night as he had slept with "mummy" since leaving his own mother (when my parents divorced, Dad kept the older dog) and things weren't about to change now. If left downstairs, he howled. Bassets really can howl.

In the middle of the night my mother woke to hear the dog going nuts. Being a good feminist she woke my step father "Frank, go find out who's there."

So Frank got up, called out "who's there?" and *turned on the light*.

Who was there, was two police officers, a man and a woman, who were checking for rough sleepers in derelict buildings, and were very embarrassed indeed to discover that the hound of the baskervilles who wasn't letting them move so much as a millimeter towards my room (I slept through this of course) was actually one of the goofiest looking breeds in existence, with a reputation for licking people to death.

The point of this anecdote? Because the first thing most people do when they hear something, is turn on the light. And I'm kind of curious about someone who goes on to a balcony, comes back (presumably with diminished night sight), gets their gun in the dark but does notice their girlfriend is absent, still does not turn on a light, and opens fire without calling out "Girlfriend, is that you?"
fjm: (Default)
Desert Island Discs, for those who don't know (anyone?) is one of the Great Radio 4 programmes. It's been running since 1942. Some guests are more interesting than others, but there is no question that appearing there is a nod from the establishment.

Today's guest is Julie Burchill. For those who missed it--anyone?--under the guide of defending a friend Ms Burchill ripped loose with hate speech that would have had my not very radical grandmother washing her mouth out with soap.

I won't link to the original article, or even the screen capture, but this is the Observer's readers' editor's comment in the aftermath: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jan/18/julie-burchill-and-the-observer.


So this week I will not be listening to Desert Island Discs, and I have tweeted my protest.

Everyone is entitled to free speech. That is not the same as handing someone an honoured platform.
fjm: (Default)
Thank you to everyone who commented.


Tips for getting a PhD (with help from various friends).

Tips on getting your PhD (works for humanities, can be extrapolated for sciences).

1. Pick a doable topic that you love and find fascinating. If you are in the Arts, do not end up working on your supervisor’s pet project, if you are in the sciences, make sure the team you join is in an area that really does interest you. Keep in mind the criteria “doable in three years”: this is not a life's work, it is your final qualifying exam.
2. Make sure you like your supervisor, you are going to spend a long time with them.
3. Make sure your supervisor has a reputation for reading work in a timely fashion, and introducing graduates to other people.
4. Go to conferences. Make sure you talk to people (handy tip: insert into your paper comments such as “if you want to know more about this, ask me later”. People will.). Never decline an introduction.* Find mentors other than your advisor. Most people in the field like chatting to active researchers (as we get more advanced we are more likely to be synthesisers than originators).
5. Read all the dedicated material. Set up a system to do this, however arbitrary: by alphabetical order, or by publishing order or you will get swamped. (and always note which library you read it in, along with your other notes, it will save time at the checking stage).
6. Start following odd links to things that don’t seem to be related—think about how you can apply them “metaphorically”.
7. Be prepared to spend time learning new skills which will add to your pool of materials and your depth of understanding, -- this may mean sitting in on an undergraduate course or asking for help from another academic, but is worth it.
8. Think of your thesis as a diamond shape: you start with a narrow idea, let it widen, and widen, and widen, and then you sit down and narrow it down. This may happen repeatedly.
9. Have small, doable targets: meeting a target gives you the confidence to set the next one; not meeting it often leaves students depressed. Too many students set too large targets and set themselves up for failure.
a. Try to write something every day, even if it’s only a paragraph along the lines of “today I thought about x, here’s why it doesn’t work”.
b. Read and research in sections: if you wait until you have read everything, you may never start writing. Keep in mind that your real thesis will only emerge with revision anyway.
10. Focus on questions, rather than answers: what questions does your data throw up?
11. When you start writing up, the rule of three is very handy: Every chapter in three sections; every section in three parts; every argument at least three pieces of evidence.
12. Your writing style should always consist of: Argument, evidence, analysis. Check each paragraph to make sure that all three components are there (preferably in that order).


*Yes, I’ve had grad students do this. I was not wholly surprised when they disappeared from the field.



Money: even if you are lucky enough to get a grant, you are going to be very short of money. Assume that you will be working, and make sure you plan your research around it. Be selfish about your time and make it clear to friends and family that “just one day off” accumulates very rapidly.




Additional thoughts.

There are times when you will feel overwhelmed: if this doesn’t happen, you aren’t reading widely enough/producing enough data.

There are times when you will feel bored: if this doesn’t happen, you lack rigour.

There are times when you will feel “What is the point of this?”: if you don’t you probably aren't human.

Always try to have a more compact project on the side for moments when you can’t face the thesis, it will help you to remember you really do enjoy academic work, and will keep you a practiced writer when your thesis is in the research stage. (a science friend advises: “come up with your own ideas for projects, whether directly related to the thesis or not, and try to develop these into other, or complementary, lines of research.”)



[Feel free to link]
fjm: (Default)
Our Treadmill has broken and needs a new motor (cost £139) so we've decided to take this moment to get a cross trainer (I have bad knees so low impact matters).

Before we send it to the junk yard, is there anyone out there who would like it? It folds flat and can be stored against a wall. It's about four years old. Has very basic programmes. Originally cost around £300.

(I've already put it on Freecycle and not had so much as a nibble).
fjm: (Default)
'Fast/Slow: Intensifications of Cinematic Speed', which Neil Archer & I are currently organising. The symposium will take place at Anglia Ruskin University on April 4-5.

In addition to an exciting programme of talks and events, the symposium will include keynote addresses by Professor Sean Cubitt, and Professor Karen Beckman (see below for bios).

We warmly welcome members of staff to attend. Further details may be found here: www.anglia.ac.uk/fastslow

Kind Regards,
Tina and Neil

Prof. Sean Cubitt is currently researching the history of visual technologies, media art history, and relationships between environmental and post-colonial criticism of film and media, three strands that converge around the political economy of globalization and aesthetics. His publications include EcoMedia (Rodopi, 2005
), The Cinema Effect (MIT Press, 2004), 
Simulation and Social Theory (Sage, 2001), Digital Aesthetics (Sage, 1998), Videography: Video Media as Art and Culture (Macmillan,1993), 
and Timeshift: On Video Culture (Routledge, 1991).

Karen Beckman is the Elliot and Roslyn Jaffe Professor of Cinema and Modern Media in the department of the History of Art. She is the author of Vanishing Women: Magic, Film and Feminism (Duke UP, 2003); Crash: Cinema and the Politics of Speed and Stasis (Duke UP, 2010), and is now working on a new book, Animation and the Contemporary Art of War. She is co-editor of two volumes: Still Moving: Between Cinema and Photography with Jean Ma (Duke UP, September 2008) and On Writing With Photography (forthcoming, Minnesota UP) with Liliane Weissberg, and is currently editing a book entitled Animating Film Theory, which explores the marginalization of animation in film theoretical discussions. She has published articles on a range of subjects, including feminism and terrorism, death penalty photography, the animated documentary, and the relationship between cinema and contemporary art. She is a senior editor of the journal Grey Room.
fjm: (Default)
WRITING FOR CHILDREN (a full day of talks, workshops and conversation)


Saturday 23 February 2013 10.00 am-4.00 pm
Ty Crawshay, University of Glamorgan Treforest Campus, CF37 1DL
Tickets: see below

A scintillating celebration of Welsh children's authors and illustrators . On Saturday 23 February 2013, Literature Wales will be holding the Writing for Children Conference as part of the South Wales Literature Development Initiative.
Experience a full day of talks, workshops and conversation including: exploring author and illustrator collaboration; rugby zombies, dystopian writing, speed dating for authors and illustrators, digitizing children’s publishing to name but a few. There will be plenty of chances for you to get involved with writing and drawing too.
The conference will be held in collaboration with the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at Tŷ Crawshay, the University of Glamorgan, Treforest Campus. Philip Gross and Phil Carradice will introduce an exciting day featuring a wealth of talented authors, illustrators and publishers including: Bardd Plant Cymru - Eurig Salisbury, Young People’s Laureate - Catherine Fisher, Ruth Morgan, Chris Glynn, Ifor Thomas, Thomas Docherty, Mike Jenkins, Dan Anthony, Huw Aaron and Mike Church. There will be a presentation on digitizing Children’s Publishing by Kate Wilson, Director of Nosy Crow and the unique opportunity of eight one to one sessions with Viv Sayer, editor of Gomer.
The Conference aims to attract and celebrate the creative writing talents of people of all ages and abilities. It will be an ideal event to showcase a particular genre of literature which is gaining more popularity and interest and will help to promote its enjoyment and relevance today.
Day Tickets to the conference are now available at the following prices:
Under 16’s Free
Students/Members £10 with lunch £6 without
Non members £14 with lunch £10 without
For more information and to book your place contact Literature Wales on: 029 2047 2266 or email post@literaturewales.org
fjm: (Default)
In honour of the donation of Robert J. Sawyer's papers and archives to McMaster University, in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, that institution is hosting an academic conference entitled “Science Fiction: The Interdisciplinary Genre” Friday, September 13, through Sunday, September 15, 2013.

The call for papers is attached, as is a flyer about the conference, and more information is here:
http://sfwriter.com/blog/?p=3514

The CFP is also available online here: http://sfwriter.com/mcmaster-sf-conference-cfp.doc

And the flyer is here: http://sfwriter.com/mcmaster-sf-conference-flyer.pdf

Special guests at the conference are Hugo Award-winning author Robert J. Sawyer, Order of Canada member John Robert Colombo, Aurora Award-winning author Julie E. Czerneda, Hugo Award-winning editor David G. Hartwell, Aurora Award-winning author Élisabeth Vonarburg, Hugo Award-winning author Robert Charles Wilson, and Chris Szego, manger of Bakka Phoenix Books, the world's oldest extant science-fiction specialty store.

This is sure to be the largest academic conference about science fiction in Canada in 2013, and the biggest academic conference on Canadian science fiction ever held. The conference will be open to the general public.
fjm: (Default)
Grand Gestures, Gateshead's elders dance company, want to work with a biomedical scientist in the devising of their new performance work, 'Croak', which will explore the art and science of breathing. They'll be making an application to the Wellcome Trust for an Arts Award, designed to 'Support imaginative and experimental arts projects that create new artworks to investigate biomedical science.' It's a public engagement opportunity for a friendly and open-minded scientist, ideally someone with an interest in breathing. I'll be working with the project as an ethnographer.

Here's a link to some to a video of Grand Gestures:
http://vimeo.com/53155129

And the Wellcome Trust Arts Awards:
http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/Funding/Public-engagement/Funding-schemes/Arts-Awards/index.htm

If you know of anyone who might be interested in discussing this, please do forward this email on. They can contact me in the first instance.

Trish

Dr Trish Winter
Senior Lecturer

Winter, T. and Keegan-Phipps, S. (2013, in press) 'Performing Englishness: identity and politics in a contemporary folk resurgence'. Manchester: Manchester University Press.

http://www.crmcs.sunderland.ac.uk/research-staff/trish-winter/
fjm: (Default)
From Anglia Ruskin (where I work now)

Mary Humphrey, graduate of the BA Photography and now studying on our MA programme has been shortlisted for the Aesthetica Art Prize in York and will be exhibiting her work on Roma:Transilvania ( her work produced for the Major Project on the BA Photography) at York St Mary's. This is a wonderful achievement! Please see below some information about the exhibition:

Exhibition 8 March – 28 April 2013

The Aesthetica Art Prize culminates in a major exhibition, showcasing innovative and outstanding works of art from across the prize, in spring 2013. Hosted by Aesthetica Magazine, the Aesthetica Art Prize Exhibition is held in partnership with York Museums Trust, The Hepworth Wakefield, York St John University, Prestel, AWOL Studios and Lawrence Art Supplies, and presents shortlisted works from eight artists in the following categories: Photographic & Digital Art, Three Dimensional Design & Sculpture, Painting & Drawing, and Video, Installation & Performance.

Running from 8 March until 28 April 2013 at the stunning York St Mary’s, York Art Gallery’s contemporary art space, this show highlights artistic talent from locations as diverse as the USA, South Korea, Australia, Denmark and the UK. The prize supports and brings the work of emerging artists to a wider audience. From thousands of entered artworks, the top eight have been chosen for exhibition and a further 100 will feature in the accompanying publication. The winner will be announced at the opening night on 7 March by a panel comprising influential art figures including curators, artists and the Editor of Aesthetica Magazine.

All longlisted works are featured in the accompanying publication, which, as well as being dedicated to the commended works, will also include essays that discuss relevant topics in today’s artistic milieu.

Aesthetica Art Prize Exhibition, York St Mary’s, Castlegate, York, YO1 9RN. Free admission.

Kerstin Hacker

Course Leader BA (Hons) Photography
Convenor MA Photography (2013 Start)
Employability Champion for the Cambridge School of Art
fjm: (Default)
I'm going to put this up on my web site. What have I missed? Got wrong? Etc.


Tips on getting your PhD (works for humanities, can be extrapolated for sciences).

1. Pick a doable topic.
2. Make sure you like your supervisor, you are going to spend a long time with them.
3. Make sure your supervisor has a reputation for reading work in a timely fashion, and introducing graduates to other people.
4. Read all the dedicated material.
5. Start following odd links to things that don’t seem to be related—think about how you can apply them “metaphorically”.
6. Think of your thesis as a diamond shape: you start with a narrow idea, let it widen, and widen, and widen, and then you sit down and narrow it down.
7. Try to write something every day, even if it’s only a paragraph along the lines of “today I thought about x, here’s why it doesn’t work”.
8. Focus on questions, rather than answers: what questions does your data throw up?
9. When you start writing up, the rule of three is very handy: Every chapter in three sections; every section in three parts; every argument at least three pieces of evidence.
10. Your writing style should always consist of: Argument, evidence, analysis. Check each paragraph to make sure that all three components are there (preferably in that order).


There are times when you will feel overwhelmed: if this doesn’t happen, you aren’t reading widely enough/producing enough data.

There are times when you will feel bored: if this doesn’t happen, you lack rigour.

There are times when you will feel “What is the point of this?”: if you don’t you probably aren't human.

Always try to have a more compact project on the side for moments when you can’t face the thesis, it will help you to remember you really do enjoy academic work, and will keep you a practiced writer when your thesis is in the research stage.
Page generated Oct. 24th, 2017 12:09 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios